Rosemary Scalera - CENTURY 21 McLennan & Co


The location of the homes you’re looking at in your search is key. You probably have at least a couple of cities and towns narrowed down, but do you know specifics? Is there a particular neighborhood that you would prefer to live in? The street that you choose to live on will also have a lot to do with the way that you conduct your life. If you live on the main road, for example, you’ll face a lot of noise and traffic. If you have kids, that may not be the ideal situation. There’s many reasons that living on a dead end street is the ideal situation. Be on the lookout for homes on cul-de-sacs and dead end streets in your home search. Read on to see the many advantages of living on a street that’s not a throughway.


The Traffic Is Significantly Less


There are very few cars that head down a street that’s not a throughway. No one will be using your street as a shortcut. This makes it much safer for children to play outside and it reduces noise in the neighborhood. 


There’s A Sense Of Security


Since there isn’t a lot of traffic on a dead-end street, it‘s easy to identify strange cars that are lurking around. The people in your neighborhood will all be more alert to any kind of unusual activity on the street. This allows for a more secure feeling in your own backyard. 


A Dead End Street Is A Great Place To Raise Kids


Your kids will have a bit more freedom to play and be kids when you live on a dead end street. There’s less traffic to worry about while the kids play, yet you have a great opportunity to teach your kids about traffic safety rules and how to act around strangers. Your children will also become close with other children in the neighborhood. The adults who live in your neighborhood will become acquainted with your children as well. You’ll definitely appreciate a tight-knit community if you have kids. 


Your Property Value Will Stay High


It’s hard to say that a home on a dead end street will decrease in value. With a strong community sense and safety perks, these homes will be in demand. When you do decide to sell your home, you’re sure to get a good return on your property investment if you choose a home on a dead end street.


Selling your home and relocating to a new residence may seem difficult. Fortunately, we're here to help you take the guesswork out of packing up your belongings and moving to your new house.

Here are three moving tips that every home seller needs to know.

1. Make Reservations with a Moving Company.

After you sell your house, you'll want to make reservations with a moving company as soon as possible. By doing so, you'll be able to ensure that you can get movers to your house before you need to have all of your belongings out of your residence.

Remember, the longer you wait to book a moving company, the less likely it becomes that you'll be able to find one in time for your upcoming move. But if you take a proactive approach to your move, you'll be able to book a moving company with plenty of time to spare.

Don't forget to shop around for a moving company too. This will ensure that you won't have to break your budget to employ friendly, professionally trained movers to help you transport your belongings from Point A to Point B.

2. Clean Out Every Room in Your House.

Although you've already devoted plenty of time and resources to keep your home clean and neat as you tried to sell it, you'll want to conduct a final sweep of every room before you move.

Cleaning out your entire home will enable you to double-check to ensure that you've packed up everything and reduce the risk that you'll leave something behind. Plus, doing a final sweep will enable you to locate and get rid of any forgotten items that you won't need at your new address.

Spend some time cleaning out your home, and ultimately, you'll be better equipped to pack up all of your belongings and avoid the risk of forgetting items hidden in your attic, basement or other areas of your house.

3. Disconnect All of Your Home Services.

Contact your electric utility provider, phone and internet services provider and other utility services companies to inform them about your upcoming relocation. This will enable you to cancel services or transfer them to your new address.

When it comes to disconnecting services, be sure to give your service provider as much notice as possible. For instance, calling your internet services provider to cancel your services on the day of your move could be problematic, as you may need to return equipment.

However, if you reach out to a service provider at least a few weeks before your move, you can plan accordingly.

Furthermore, if you ever have concerns or questions about moving, your real estate agent may be able to help you. This professional can offer moving recommendations and tips and might even be able to put you in touch with expert movers in your area as well.

Start getting ready for your upcoming move now, and you can streamline the process of vacating your current residence and relocating to a new house.


Many people think that if they live in a so-called "nice neighborhood" that they're immune to residential crime. While it's true that the probability of having their home or cars broken into may be lower than in urban or high-crime areas, there's always the outside chance that there's someone wandering through the neighborhood -- especially at night -- who doesn't have the best of intentions. While that does not mean you have to be in a state of "high alert" all the time, it does make sense to develop good habits with regard to home security. One thing to avoid is being lulled into a state of complacency by the the sight of manicured lawns, friendly neighbors, and the peaceful atmosphere of your neighborhood. Although those qualities are well worth appreciating and being grateful for, an ounce of prevention can help preserve the sanctity of your home and property. Typical Security Mistakes Homeowners Make Whether you're talking about highway safety, food safety, or home security, you and your family can lead a safer, more secure life by following a few basic guidelines. Unfortunately, all-too-many people tend to let their guard down and leave themselves vulnerable to threats, like home break-ins, burglary, and other residential crimes. Have you noticed any neighbors on your street who seem to "throw caution to the wind" when they're away? Maybe you, too, have gotten a little too complacent or forgetful about basic home security measures. Here are a few of the common mistakes many people make -- especially when they're on vacation -- which could be an invitation to trouble:
  1. Leaving a house key under the front door mat: Although it may seem like a convenient and somewhat discreet place to "hide" a key, it's one of the first places a resourceful burglar is going to look. Not only that, but every time a friend or member of the family accesses that key, they could easily be observed by someone passing by. The longer it's there, the more people are going to see it.
  2. Forgetting to suspend mail or newspaper delivery: When you go on vacation or visit relatives for more than a few days, your mind is already cluttered with travel plans and other arrangements. It's easy to forget about details like mail delivery and newspapers accumulating in the driveway. However, if either of those items start piling up in front of your house, it's equivalent to placing a flashing neon sign in your window, saying "Nobody's home!" Rather than contacting the post office and newspaper circulation department, an easier method is to have a trusted neighbor or friend gather your deliveries and store them in a safe place -- possibly inside your home. (If they're a really good friend, they can also water your plants, feed your tropical fish, take care of your pets, and turn on a couple lights at night -- but, maybe you don't want to test the limits of your friendship that much!)
  3. Leaving lampposts and outdoor floodlights on continuously: Again, it's like an advertisement that the house is unoccupied.
  4. Allowing the grass to get too long: It's amazing how a little sunshine and rain, while you're away, can cause an unexpected growth spurt in your lawn. Although it's not as obvious as the previous items, it can be a tip off that the family is on vacation, blissfully unaware of the security breaches that are occurring. The overgrown grass problem can be prevented by either hiring a regular lawn mowing service or recruiting an enterprising teenager in the neighborhood to keep your property looking well tended while you're away.
There are potentially dozens of home security measures you can take to ensure that your premises are completely burglarproof, but they can be expensive and complicated. However, if you just follow a few commonsense guidelines, both your possessions and your peace of mind should remain fully intact!

As a society we are realizing how increasingly important it is to practice becoming more eco-conscious in our day to day lives. You probably already practice some eco-friendly habits whether it’s reusable bags at the grocery store, signing up for a recycling bin or carrying a water bottle around with your throughout the day. There are lots of small steps we can take. Below are some you may not have thought of, or have been meaning to start carrying out and just need that extra push! When Cleaning: Choose non-toxic cleaning products and microfiber clothes over traditional cleaners. Microfiber clothes are a fantastic multitasker to keep in your cleaning arsenal. Used damp they are great for cleaning and scrubbing while when dry they can be used for dusting. Since microfiber clothes seemingly have cleaning super powers you will find yourself needing less cleaning product. When you do need a product to get the job done opt for a more natural or even homemade one. Vinegar and baking soda are two kitchen ingredients that are also efficient cleaners as well! Smart purchases: Buy items made of recycled materials and reusable options over one-use products. Look for natural cleaners and products for not only around the home but for personal use too. What you put on your body matters, after all, your skin is your largest organ! When buying detergent look for a concentrated variety instead of the traditional watered-down options. And avoid dry cleaning! It’s electric: Look for solar powered outdoor lights to save on your electric bill and, if possible, install solar panels as an energy source for your home. There are many companies today whose goal is to make solar panels more affordable for the average household. When upgrading old appliances purchase low energy varieties that are Energy Star qualified. Bonus points: you can usually get tax credits for doing so! Need a free way to save electricity? Turn off the lights when you leave a room and unplug any electronics not in use. Electronics can use power when plugged in even if they are not turned on! Try using power strips with an on-off switch to easily control electricity flow. CFL (compact fluorescent) and LED bulbs use less energy to heat than traditional ones and while pricier they pay for themselves over time. Water wisely: Bathrooms are, naturally, the place where the most water is used. There a few upgrades you can make, for example, look for low-flow toilets and showerheads with the WaterSense label. Installing a recirculating water pump saves on water by allowing water to be hot when you turn on the faucet so you don’t have to let the water run while waiting for the temperature to change. Some free ways to save on water? Turn off the faucet while brushing your teeth and flush the toilet less often throughout the day. Heating & cooling: Thermal drapes are great in the winter to keep out the cold and in the summer to keep out the heat of the sun. Keep drapes open during the day and closed at night during winter and closed during the day and open at night during the summer. Opt for ceiling fans over air conditioning to save on energy in the summer months. In the winter, opt for more layers instead of increasing the room temperature. Draft stoppers and carpeting on hardwood floors are another way to keep your home warmer when it’s cold out. There are so many ways to make your home a more eco-friendly one. Whether you have money to invest in smart upgrades or opt for the more frugal habits each eco-conscious step you take will have a positive impact in the long run on not only the environment but your wallet as well.

The winter time can be a beautiful season. The cold weather makes spending the holidays gathered by the fire that much cozier and more cheerful. However, the winter also brings new challenges that you’ll need to adapt to and prepare for.

If this is your first winter as a northerner, read on to find out how to prepare your house so you can keep things running smoothly throughout the freezing season.

Clean up the leaves

Those beautiful autumn leaves only last a few weeks before they start to litter your backyard, driveway, and clog your gutters. While small amounts of leaves can be mulched and turned into a healthy fertilizer for your lawn, huge piles will attract insects and decompose too slowly to be useful throughout the winter.

Sweeping your driveway and walkways will also ensure you remove any stones that may get caught in your snow blower once the first winter storm hits.

Finally, remove leaves and other debris from your gutter. Wet piles of leaves in your gutter will freeze and damage your gutters, stopping water from effectively running off of your roof and eventually causing leaks and water damage.

Roof and chimney maintenance

While you’re up on the ladder, it’s a good time to inspect your roof and chimney. A blocked chimney isn’t only a safety hazard, it can also up your utility bill by decreasing the efficiency of your stove.

When it comes to the roof itself, make sure your shingles are in good condition and that none are missing or decayed. Roof shingles take a beating in the winter time and, if you aren’t quick to remove any snow that falls onto your roof, outdated shingles can easily become a source of water damage.

Outside water

After you’ve cleaned your car one last time, detach your outdoor hoses and shut off the water supply to your outdoor faucet. This valve is usually found in your basement, crawl spaces, or sometimes in your garage.

Check for safety issues near heating sources

Before you turn on the heat for the first time, it’s a good idea to walk through your home and make sure curtains and other fire hazards are a safe distance from your stove, radiator, and any other heat sources.


To make sure all of that heat you’re producing stays in the house, this is also a good time to check for air leaks. If you’re concerned with energy costs (and who isn’t?) you could consider improving the insulation of your home by replacing weatherstripping, using insulation film on your windows, or replacing your windows altogether.

Monitor and compare your heating bills

If you use electric heating, many utility companies offer online tools to compare your bills with previous months and years, or with other homeowners in your area. This will give you a good idea of how much money you should be spending on heat and troubleshoot any issues you find.




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